Archive | June, 2018

KENYA’S NEXT PRESIDENT: WHY HISTORY HOLDS THE ANSWER

30 Jun

Javas Bigambo

Kenya’s political terrain is jagged and tough, and that is not going to adjust in the foreseeable future, given certain variables that remain constant. The sword of Damocles keeps hanging above the heads of many, and many candidates get guillotined by the uncompromising interests of power players.

History is a powerful lens through which certain future prognoses can be made. In politics success can be slippery, and compromise can be at times costly, and at other times handsomely beneficial.

There is this small magnetic issue of serving as President of Kenya. From Kenya’s founding, historical realities depict one hard fact – Presidents in Kenya are made. No one makes himself President. Listen to wise voices.

The best one can do is to build their profile, keep tightly close to the powers, coyly magnify your wisdom, without bringing out Caesar’s insolent ambition, which caused him his life. Jomo Kenyatta was made President by Jaramogi’s charitable confidence. Moi never made himself President, he was made. Kibaki never made himself President, Raila’s declaration wrapped it. Uhuru never made himself President, in fact he was most disinclined. Audacious ambition has its place. To all persons eyeing that glorious seat, avoid Caesar’s fate.

Learn from the Crocodile, it never roars, but it is tactful, swift and an encounter with it assures fatality – not its own but yours. Take no lesson from the Cheetah, its chase is optically exciting, but nothing much thereafter. Listen to me, then you will become President.

SHADOWS ON THE MOVE: RE-THINKING INTERVENTIONS FOR OVERCOMING DYNAMICS OF YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT AND OTHER CHALLENGES

11 Jun

By Javas Bigambo

Each side you turn your head in every city, town or village in Kenya, you are bound to be met with sad faces of youth in a hodge-podge of misfortune ranging from growing unemployment, substance use and abuse, irresponsible sexual behavior, struggling SMEs with nose-diving profits, self-help groups with limited support, and generally a canopy of young men and women wallowing in self pity.

Javas Bigambo:What is sadly true is that most young people in Kenya are simply shadows in the movement of economic growth.

Each leader and community member should examine his of her conscience about what contribution they are making toward ameliorating the lives of young people in Kenya.

With the right support, mentorship, motivation and guidance, each young person has an unqualified chance to be successful and happy through hard work.

So far, many great initiatives have been rolled out by the government, youth organizations and development partners toward empowerment of the youth. The institutionalization of financial aide through Youth Enterprise Development Fund remains creditable, and progressive.

Nonetheless, ominous challenges still exist and great opportunities still await the too many frontiers of the youth in Kenya.

Youth leaders and organizations have to get impatient with the slow pace of empowerment and transformation among the youth, regardless of commendable efforts and programmes in the past 20 years. The goal of youth empowerment remains unreached, predictable challenges not surmounted, and legislation alone cannot be the dependable cure.

Unemployment; reviewing institutionalization of financial aide for the youth; support in venturing into and mastering entrepreneurship; understanding dynamics of and positioning themselves in political leadership; and responsible sexual behavior.

Urbanization also has accentuated and spiraled various kinds of evils and crimes. We cannot be demure about the scale of these challenges if we robustly intend to squelch them. From these perspectives, it is obvious that the nation is faced with moral, economic and academic challenges with regard to the challenges facing the youth.

Platforms such as AGPO (Access to Government Procurement Opportunities) are working fairly well, but the ultimate success points remain elusive, because far too many youth-owned companies remain stuck due to unpaid invoices from government agencies, as well as county and national governments.

More needs to be done in policy and programme-level interventions. There is need for expansion of urban and rural job opportunities, through robust infrastructure development, and a commitment to employ 50% of youth in all public funded projects, so as to narrow the variance between economic growth and employment generation in the public sector.

The government should provide more benefits too in tax relief for all private sector institutions that provide paid internships and also take up interns upon completion.

On the academic front, the national and county governments need to upscale interventions that enhance increased transition rates in educational institutions, to lend meaning to the constitutional provision of education being a right in Kenya.

For the youth who are already in gainful employment, stakeholders need to establish vigorous programmes that would boost the culture of saving money, and encourage investments.

The youth remain statistically significant. The sad part is that they are mainly looked at statistics, and their premium valued during election times. Report after report has been released by key sector players on youth matters and how palpable momentum can be built for fitting interventions.

All youth in Kenya, premised on the constitutional provision of non-discrimination on grounds of race, gender, ethnicity, or religion necessarily should have equal access to quality education and health care and the favourable economic and social opportunity to grow up in safer neighborhoods, communities and counties, in pursuit of happiness.

The East African Community, with the cooperation and help of the Ministry of Public Service, Youth and Gender, the ministry of East African Community and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, need to establish a strong mechanism and cross-border interventions to help the youth overcome their economic woes.

Continentally, the African Union should revisit, and audit the Africa Youth Charter endorsed by the 2006 Heads of State Summit, and renew obligations of nation-states to the letter and spirit of the that Charter.

As a country, Kenya must look to long years ahead of challenges for the youth, unless there is expeditious multi-stakeholders’ synergy building and interventions on the multi-faceted woes bedeviling youth in Kenya. What is sadly true is that most young people in Kenya are simply shadows in the movement of economic growth.

The writer is the Chair of the Youth Agenda Board of Directors.